Support for Charles Fréger, photographer

Charles Fréger © Nacása & Partners Inc.
Photographer Charles Fréger © Nacása & Partners Inc.
Charles Fréger, "CIMARRON" series, 2016 © Charles Fréger
Charles Fréger, "CIMARRON" series, 2016 © Charles Fréger
Charles Fréger, « YÔKAÏNOSHIMA » exhibit, Le Forum, Tokyo, 2016 © Nacása & Partners Inc.
Charles Fréger, « YÔKAÏNOSHIMA » exhibit, Le Forum, Tokyo, 2016 © Nacása & Partners Inc.
Charles Fréger, « YÔKAÏNOSHIMA » series, 2013-2015
Charles Fréger, « YÔKAÏNOSHIMA » series, 2013-2015 © Charles Fréger
Charles Fréger, « WILDER MANN » exhibition view at TH13, Berne, 2012
Charles Fréger, « WILDER MANN » exhibition view at TH13, Berne, 2012 © DR
Charles Fréger, "WILDER MANN" series, 2010-2011 © Charles Fréger
Charles Fréger, "WILDER MANN" series, 2010-2011 © Charles Fréger
"Wilder Mann" and "Yakoînoshima" were the first installments of a photographic exploration into popular rites and traditions using costume. With "Cimarron", Charles Fréger expands this research further afield: to the Caribbean, to Latin America and to southern USA. The Foundation reaffirms its loyal support for his work.

Popular traditions and primitive rituals are at the heart of Charles Fréger’s creations. His work explores the figure of the ‘wild man’ from an anthropological perspective. Around the world, from Finland to Greece, Germany and Bulgaria, in a first series of photographs entitled Wilder Mann. “Beyond picturesque carnival characters and folklore, I wanted to capture the community of ‘wild men’” (Charles Fréger). For this first exhibition, the Foundation introduced the photographer to audiences in Berne in 2012 (at its artistic space, TH13) and then to New York in 2013 (at The Gallery at Hermès). Wilder Mann is also the subject of a book published by Thames & Hudson.

The second leg of the artist’s research took him to Japan. Dressed in costumes made of straw or coloured paper, their faces hidden by masks depicting animals, monsters or flowers, some bearing giant wings. Throughout the spring and winter, Charles Fréger trawled all four corners of Japan, taking photographs of yokaï (spectres) and oni (monsters). The result is a prolific and bestiary series of portraits. Supporting the artist more closely than ever, the Fondation d’entreprise Hermès sponsored the photographer’s travels and presented the exhibition at Le Forum in Tokyo, before funding the artist’s appearance at the Rencontres d’Arles. A book has been published by Actes Sud to accompany these exhibitions.

For Cimarron, the third part of the artist’s work, the focus shifted to afro-Caribbean and afro-American cultures. Part-interbreeding, part-culture clash. A journey through 14 countries. The Fondation d’entreprise Hermès once more faithfully supports Charles Fréger on this latest adventure, soon to be showcased in a new book.

www.charlesfreger.com

Disciplines
Visual arts
Photography
Popular traditions and primitive rituals are at the heart of Charles Fréger’s creations. His work explores the figure of the ‘wild man’ from an anthropological perspective.
Dressed in costumes made of straw or coloured paper, their faces hidden by masks depicting animals, monsters or flowers, some bearing giant wings.
Support to introduce the photographer to new audiences.

See also